02.26.09

Try To Avoid Fish That Stink

Posted in Brenda at 11:08 am by livefood

The techniques for getting hired quickly are pretty much the same too…cast a big net in the right place often enough and quickly enough and you land the job. Well…it’s a little more complicated than that of course, but essentially the “head set” of finding a job remains the same.

I have a young friend who has really never looked for a job. He is handed jobs by friends and family and each job seems to be less and less demanding, he learns less and less from each successive position and none of the jobs are better or higher up the chain than the last…come to think about it, they seem to pay a bit less each time. He is essentially moving backwards. What is with that?

He is not really looking for jobs. He says he is, but there is no action behind the babble. Like always, if you are not actively casting the net for a fish, you probably won’t catch one…and one that jumps into the boat and catches you might be a bad situation. Or that fish that washes up on the beach at your feet just might have a bit of a stench to it. My young friend needs to put some effort into the search.

Even with the advent of the internet as a source of finding people and positions…if you don’t use it, you will not benefit from it. Our having superlative tools at the office to help us find folks to talk too does not change the fact that we have to pick up the phone and talk to folks…and while we might tend to use cell phones as opposed to the push buttons of the past…and we use email extensively…we still do use personal conversations and find that the phone and face to face conversations are still extremely important.

Some things haven’t changed with the job hunting either. When you look for a position on the net, one should take the same amount of care as one might have, or should have, 20 years ago (or more). I read a couple hundred resumes every day…and more than half don’t really tell me what the person wants to do, what they did for their former employers or what the employers did for that matter. Believe me, the other half of the resumes keep me plenty busy…too bad for the half that didn’t use a more fundamental approach to the resume construction.

Just two days ago I was speaking with a potential candidate looking to make a move. As it turned out we can not help him so he asked for some advice. My best suggestion for him was to build a network. Much like one might have done in the past at social gatherings and business events, one can network fairly quickly on the internet. With LinkedIn, Facebook and other similar sites, one can build a network quickly and with a fair amount of targeting.

However, that cold and rather sterile email that we all love to use needs to be used a bit differently with the networking thing. Networking is a two way street…there is always a quid pro quo…you give and receive, or receive and give…those who only take don’t get that much…so give at least something in return…a thank you and offer to help going forward if nothing else. Don’t overlook the notion of thank you…another opportunity to get your name in front of folks to remember you and perhaps refer you to a hiring manager. Sending an email as a thank you really does help.

I write this while searching a raft of data banks today and found this gem…purported to be from a real resume. Of course I found it on a bulletin board focusing on dogs (really!) so take it for what it’s worth…

“Here are my qualifications for you to overlook.”

Errors like that really make my day…still making them after all these years.

02.25.09

The Tools Are Different But The Game Is The Same

Posted in Brenda at 11:09 am by livefood

A while ago I was speaking with a new tool vendor (another iteration of a search tool) and he and I were laughing at where we have come from in the search business.

When we purchased our first “real” computer back in 1985 it was touted as a tool that would render our office paperless (HA!) and would drive our competitors (or maybe us) out of business. Well we didn’t believe either. We used reams of paper…in a literal sense. Competitors who have left the industry did so on their own accord…we and our fancy computers had nothing to do with that.

The industry gurus tell us that the face of recruiting has changed and will change even more. It’s almost as if I’m hearing the same GIGO that was being uttered in 1985. The face of recruiting has changed with the rest of the world, but essentially the nuts and bolts or recruiting, hiring and retaining good people has retained much of the “flavor” of the mid-80s…and the humorous thing is that the process of GETTING hired has retained much of it’s essential elements also.

Oh sure, the size of the net we cast is larger now and the speed with which we do that casting is much quicker, but the fact that we cast a net and still use a net is essentially the same. Also, just as we had to do some 20 years ago…we need to know where to cast, cast better and cast faster than our competitors…those who cast less and poorly don’t eat. So basically the computers we use today (and their much smaller in size yet faster and larger capacity) help us keep track of more and more information. But the size of the lake we fish in is so larger than 20 years ago, it takes a computer to keep in some sort of perspective. Does the computer make us better than we were…not really…if you were good then you can be good now…but you had better have been willing to change the net you used for the fishing.

One might try to make the point that the World is shrinking (we heard that in the 70s after the Moon was landed upon)…one could also try to convince others that the jobs are becoming more specialized…true and they were more specialized in the 80s than the 70s…the 70s than the 60s and on and on. What does make sense is that as the employment landscape has changed (it always does and always will)…so have the tools. But the essential and core fundamental approaches to finding people remain the same.

02.24.09

Changing the Color of the Pallet

Posted in Brenda at 4:28 pm by livefood

Just about every day I am exposed to a head scratching, you-want-do-to-do-what type of situation. Sometimes the situation calls for wanting to do something that the resume and conversation does not indicate the candidate has the aptitude or the experiences to do (like breaking into the fashion industry when one is a Naval underwater welder…it happens)…actually wanting to do something “different” is fairly common. But every so often, someone wants to work within a particular time zone, usually the same as their home is in. Sometimes those people want to cut down on their commute to spend more time with family or themselves. In fact, I can’t remember the last time anyone asked us to consider them when a commute would extend their time on the road. The other day, I had a conversation with a candidate who is only interested in our finding opportunities with one local firm…she will not consider other companies. That wouldn’t be too awfully bad but she has the unfortunate encumbrance of the wrong skill set. However, the skill set is not going to be her worst friend…it’s the attitude of inflexibility that will stifle her career advancement. Of course there is a little more to the story than this one example to point out her inflexibility, but it just goes on and on. The more she talked, the more she painted herself into a corner with a bucket of slow drying restrictions. I think she will be standing there in the corner for a long time, bound by her self applied restrictions.

We can occasionally work through the issue of under-qualification…we can normally handle the commute reductions…but that inflexibility is pretty hard to work with. First you might want to think of flexibility as being a trait of one’s personality and not a skill…making it difficult to alter or change. You might think about flexibility and adaptability being closely related (I think of them that way)…and in that line of thinking, not being flexible is related to the “kiss of death” in a career path…not being able to adapt or change…or worse, not being able to accept changes.

We haven’t stayed in the recruitment world for the 20 plus years we have, without being able to adapt to changing environments (or having the environments blown away ala dotcom). It’s about the only way to successfully stay within active and vibrant industries over long periods of time. Let’s face it; unless you have just inherited a ton of money or you are party to a hugely lucrative public offering (or win a lottery) you are probably going to be in the employment picture for a while. So the ability to adapt and deal with change is a good “soft” skill that we (and our clients) would like to see more of.

Really, that old saying relating to nothing in life being a sure thing…death and taxes being exceptions can easily include “change” being a sure thing. Great oxymoron…changes and sure thing in the same phrase, but you know it’s true.

I suppose I can’t offer any real concrete advice…either you are flexible and can deal with change or you are a self inflicting artist painting yourself into corners. But I can say that when it comes to finding a good career opportunity you might want to analyze your personal picture and if you see the dark colors of inflexibility dominating the composition…try changing the color pallet a bit.

02.23.09

Well…it depends really…on a couple of things

Posted in Brenda at 2:06 pm by livefood

Of course being in the industry, I’m always interested to read articles about resumes and the like. This one came out of the New York Times. Hummmm….is it saying “always”…is it a declarative? Well it looks that way. “I object your Honor!”…perhaps I should say “I object with humor”…although I’m not too funny most of the time.

First, the fake answers to the fake questions assume that you are going have your resume read by a hiring manager. Probably not the case in a large number of situations. Big companies use readers or sourcers to go through the resumes and they could care less if a cover letter is there of not…then the resume is stripped from the source (the internet of scanned if you sent it by snail) and then put into a system of some sort that gleans bits of information (in the form of keywords) from the document. Then all of that is made available to the hiring manager who may of may not look at the original (if it is available).

I’ll make some additional comments in a bit…

A Cover Letter is Not Expendable

Published: February 14, 2009

Q. You are getting ready to apply for a job electronically, and your résumé is ready to go. Do you need to prepare a cover letter? Are they necessary in this day and age?

A. Cover letters are still necessary, and in a competitive market they can give you a serious edge if they are written and presented effectively.

Cover letters are a graceful way to introduce yourself, to convey your personality and to impress a hiring manager with your experience and your writing skills, said Katy Piotrowski, an author of career books and a career counselor based in Fort Collins, Colo. You can also tailor them to a specific company in ways that you cannot with a résumé.”

…more of my banter…seriously, a lot of material comes form resources like CareerBuilder, Dice, Monster and the like…any cover letter may or may not make it into the resume filing system or was never there in the first place.

The assumption made in the article is that one would be sending resumes to a firm you already know or have sourced yourself. That my friend doesn’t happen all that much. The recruiters for some of the largest firms (which get upwards of 10K resumes a week) would surely appreciate the 10K corresponding cover letters…right…HA HA HA.

Cover letters, like anytning else, have a place. But that place may not be as routine as the author of this NYT article would have you believe. I’m just not sure that the cover letter of today will open as many doors as it did 20 years ago. It might be better to do over your resume and optomize it like you would a web site…those keywords embedded in the content will have a much more profound effect that the cover letter trying to sell you into a position from a posting that you really didn’t read that closely.

Today I recieved a resume from a candidate that stated in that bogus section at the top (you know “the objective” section) that the goal was to get a position in the tire industry…the resume was in application for a position in “heathcare technology”…the letter was manually sent and not a robotic response…could the nexus be that folks in the healthcare industry drive cars with tires so that would make the candidate appropriately qualified? I’m at a loss…but trust me no cover letter and I was therefore not interested. Surely you jest…I do. The applicant would have more success targeting more appropriate positions. A cover letter would have not improved the chances at this location.

I could go on…but I think you understand that a cover letter may be appropriate and then again it may not be. Think about it and use the tool when the tool will work for you. It’s just not a good thing to institutionalize the tool or the process…especially when the buyer is wanting Epic and you sell tires.

But if you must make that cover letter part of your routine, please do put it on that cool paper…you know…the one that you bought in the aroma therapy section…smells like camphor…that one…with the daisy patterned watermark…or better yet…send that one to the New York Times and see how far you get with it there.

02.20.09

Simple…just plain simple

Posted in Brenda at 10:47 am by livefood

Once upon a time I would read resumes that were typed, then folks got fancy-smancy and had “resume services” do the word processing and then we had the PC for which I am eternally grateful. Now when I find a typo or a mis-used word (other than my own) I don’t feel quiet so guilty pointing it out.

However, I didn’t sit down this morning to talk about typos, although I could write for days on “Strange Typos I Have Seen”…no…today it’s about resume style.

(edit on 2-25-09)…today I peeked at a resume that has six (6) font styles and colors in the first six lines…now that is style! We usually get a good laugh at the resumes that are this bazaar and then it gets placed in the “round file.”

With the job losses we’re seeing across the country, the number of resumes is also increasing. We are in a small niche vertical and don’t really feel directly affected from the economic challenges. All of our fallout is two or three layers away from our clients…still there, just a strange set of situations that create havoc for our clients and there is nothing they can do about some of it.

But with this uptik in resumes, you would think that someone like myself (or my partner who does the sourcing) would be happy…or even giddy. No…it’s taking a lot of time to sift through resumes that have absolutely no tie to our niche…I mean like NONE. We can live with that. Folks are really stretching in what could be some pretty stressful situations. So we’ll look at the resumes and move on if we need to.

However, because we’re seeing so many resumes floating across the screen, we’re also seeing a lot of either folks who have not been in the market for a while and don’t know to think about how their resume should look and/OR folks who are just trying too hard to be different…and sometimes trying way WAY too hard.

We’re seeing a disturbing percentage of resumes that are “cute”…and I don’t mean that in a nice way. Purple backgrounds on a computer screen does not help a candidate…a yellow font on a forest green page also does not help. Floral background…you have go to be kidding. Jim was using Google on a search the other day and the number of old resumes was amazing…old in that the fonts were typewriter looking on computer screen grey or a blue grey that looked like something from the ASCII days…with PHOTOS…are you nutz?!

The world may be going to facebooky-myspacy-twittery types of communication tools…but the world of hiring still doesn’t look at the resume quiet like that. I doubt that it will within my career/lifetime. I’ve been doing this since the mid-80s and while a whole lot has changed, somethings have not…and a good solid looking resume still catches the eye and stands out…cute didn’t then and it still doesn’t. Jim will somtimes read a resume that catches his eye and even though he knows pretty quickly that the vita is not within our profile, he will read the entire resume because the look and the feel appeals to him. He’s not so quirky that there are not others who read like he does…it’s just how it goes.

If a resume is any indication of the mark you will make on a company (and it is taken that way most fo the time) then do a good job in casting yourself in a light that a company can deal with…if your mark is a purple screen I would venture that most companies will pass you by…and if your resume is old and stoggy…I would also think you would be passed over for something that looked more “normal.” Someday I’ll think about what “normal” is within the employment industry…but I think “normal” and conservative are similar with the context.

I would think that letting the words do the talking and not the layout, the colors (other than white and black), the fonts and such. I would not be so cute to leave off the contact information. Where you live is important to communicate…relocation is an important part of a conversation…upfront. I would not say, “References available upon request” (really?..well duh…). Jim screams when he sees a script type of font…it’s a blur towards the end of the day.

…and when you have worked for yourself…don’t try to hide it in a bunch of letters (your initials or your partners initials combined with yours)…self employment either works in your favor or it doesn’t…but trying to work around it in a cute and not a straightforward manner will usually come back and smack you around. Employers don’t like surprises and they don’t like cute.

What did your last employer/company do? Do you really think that most firms are going to look much further if you job responsibilities are fairly generic and they don’t know what type of firm “QCP” is or what they did. The niche firms (like ours) have an especially difficult time when the firm type is unknown. It’s just another stumbling block to deal with.

If your name is Robert…nobody on the resume reading end cares that you go by “Bo.” Don’t refer to yourself as Bo in the third person on your resume. Likewise with Samantha and Sam.

Please think about the poor schmuck (like my partner, Jim) who reads/looks at 250-300 resumes each day…that 8 point font that you used to cram all the words onto the screen is irritating. You really don’t want to irritate anyone with your resume. If you irritate someone with the first impression where do you think you will take this deal?

Simple is good. Black font on white screen is good. Ten point font minimum is good. Printer compatible is good. Well used keywords are excellent.

02.19.09

TECHNO Job Hints

Posted in Brenda at 11:22 am by livefood

I found this article and liked it. My liking employment tip articles is pretty unusual. I rarely like everything and sometimes don’t like anything that is written. Usually the “tips” are rehasded material or ideas and not very timely. However, with the following, I was surprised and wanted to pass it along…

8 technology etiquette tips for job-seekers

Wednesday, February 18, 2009
By MARK JEWELL, AP Personal Finance Writer

Full Article Link

BOSTON — If there’s any small solace when starting a job search in this recession, it’s the proliferation of digital technology to help you re-enter the working world.

Web sites like Indeed.com and LinkedIn.com have multiplied the number of job openings you can track and the professional contacts you can make. E-mail and smart phones make it easier to pitch yourself and set up appointments.

But think twice before picking up that BlackBerry and thumb-typing a message to the hiring manager whose e-mail address you so slyly uncovered online. In the end, landing the right job hinges on old-world skills.”

The article is much longer than I’ve pasted here…you should consider reading it…good stuff.

The only down side to the tips is that one might forget that while the technology “might” get your “foot in the door” as is suggested…you need to focus on getting your foot THROUGH the door…don’t get yourself wedged in there…think ahead. Plan your follow up and follow through before you start. If you are going to off to send references upon request…be prepared to fire those back as soon as they are requested. If you want to live in a techno based hiring world you need to be able to be nimble and fast. If you have found this opportunity through any of the newer media resources and have not assembled your references…you will probably look like an idiot taking a couple of days to assemble them and returning the email request. So think ahead a bit and get yourself organized.

We build a new file for every applicant we speak with. All of our notes are compiled in that one file. We use a similar process with each position we are recruiting on. We do this so that we can keep the various John’s Jacks, Jills and Susans associated with the right jobs.

You will want to keep all of the notes and information in neat little separate areas within your devices of on top of your desk. You will want to be able to call back the “Jack” who left the message, “Call me about that position…Jack”…and if you have two or three common names (we have a raft of Mike last year) it can be confusing.

In any event and through whatever method you choose to work…ACTION is the name of the game. If you are looking for a new position treat the process with the same intensity you would for your current (or last) position.

02.18.09

Fingers Crossed for Confidence

Posted in Brenda at 10:40 am by livefood

Will this help the employment scene? Perhaps is about the best I can come up with.

The housing situation is tied to the employment scene in a unique way that I’m not sure the government hs addressed. Many of the hiring managers we talk too are just a little bit apprehensive and less confident to make hiring decisions that a year ago would have been significantly easier to make. They seem to be hesitant, not because the firm can’t afford it or that they don’t have the “head count” to work within, but because they, like so many others, are working in a cloud of uncertainty. Just a general…”I don’t know.”

Government Doubles Available Aid to Fannie and Freddie (full story)

By Binyamin Appelbaum

Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, February 18, 2009; 12:13 PM

The federal government has doubled the size of its commitment to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, increasing the guarantee against losses on their mortgage investments to $400 billion.

The massive expansion of this public backstop for the troubled mortgage giants was disclosed this morning among the details of the Obama administration’s plan to reduce foreclosures.”

So while many folks will be looking at the story that I have pasted here as a story about mortgages, we are looking at is from the angle that perhaps this will start to rebuild that confidence that hiring managers and owners are needing to make decisions…I’m not saying (nor am I suggesting) that this will solve all the problems…the problems are very complex and intertwined…but I am saying that this could be…it may be…it might be…I hope it is…a start on that path of rebuilding the confidence we all need to have…in just about everything.

I’m not a huge fan on the government bailing us out of everything that goes wrong in business…the government only continues to run it’s business in a deficit…something the rest of us don’t have the luxury of doing for too long…so I’m not a fan of their management of much when it comes to business..but this confience issue is something that they can help with and I’m hoping that they are thinking about that.

It’s hard to think about your business tactics (forget strategic) when you question everything else.

I’ll keep my fingers crossed (how’s that for confidence!).

02.17.09

Subject to Change

Posted in Brenda at 3:13 pm by livefood

Just about every day I am exposed to a head scratching, you-want-do-to-do-what type of situation. Sometimes the situation is wanting to do something that the resume and conversation does not indicate the candidate has the aptitude or the experiences to do (like breaking into the fashion industry when one is a Naval underwater welder…it happens)…actually wanting to something “different” is fairly common. But every so often, someone wants to work within a particular time zone, usually the same as their home is in. Sometimes those people want to cut down on their commute to spend more time with family or themselves. In fact, I can’t remember the last time anyone asked us to consider them when a commute would extend their time on the road. The other day, I had a conversation with a candidate who is only interested in our finding opportunities with one local firm…she will not consider other companies. That wouldn’t be too awfully bad but she has the unfortunate encumbrance of the wrong skill set. However, the skill set is not going to be her worst friend…it’s the attitude of inflexibility that will stifle her career advancement. Of course there is a little more to the story than this one example to point to her inflexibility, but it just goes on and on. The more she talked, the more she painted herself into a corner with a bucket of slow drying restrictions. I think she will be standing there in the corner for a long time, bound by her self applied restrictions.
We can usually work through the issue of under-qualification…we can normally handle the commute reductions…but that inflexibility is pretty hard to work with. First you might want to think of flexibility as being a trait of one’s personality and not a skill…making it difficult to alter or change. You might think about flexibility and adaptability being closely related (I think of them that way)…and in that line of thinking, not being flexible is related to the “kiss of death” in a career path…not being able to adapt.
We haven’t stayed in the recruitment world for the 20 plus years we have, without being able to adapt to changing environments (or having the environments blown away ala dotcom). It’s about the only way to successfully stay within active and vibrant industries over long periods of time. Let’s face it; unless you are party to a hugely lucrative public offering (or win a lottery) you are probably going to be in the employment picture for a while. So the ability to adapt and deal with change is a good “soft” skill that we (and our clients) would like to see more of.
Really, that old saying relating to nothing in life being a sure thing…death and taxes being exceptions can easily include “change” being a sure thing. Great oxymoron…changes and sure thing in the same phrase, but you know it’s true.
I suppose I can’t offer any real concrete advice…either you are flexible and can deal with change or you are a self inflicting artist painting yourself into corners. But I can say that when it comes to finding a good career opportunity you might want to analyze your personal picture and if you see the dark colors of inflexibility dominating the composition…try changing the color pallet a bit.

02.16.09

A Better Resume - The One Pager Part II

Posted in Brenda at 10:30 am by livefood

When I told her to think about how her resume would be found again by either recruiters such as myself or by corporate recruiters drawing from their own submissions, she could begin to see the reason for the lack of response.

I told her that she might want to think about having two resumes…one of perhaps a couple of pages for the face to face situations …and one for the internet where it might be somewhat longer but packed with keywords.

I do see resumes on line that frequently go upwards of 12 pages…a bit much even on the internet. I also see well thought out resumes of 3 or 4 pages that do not seem to be too long. But the 3-4 page resumes are full of terms and phrases which Boolean folks will be able to use to the applicants advantage.

In most cases, the resume shows up on my computer screen in some ASCII form…rather dry. Not a whole lot of pretty lines and fonts, just data. There is no way of knowing if the person is capable or willing to put the resume on a nice piece of bond…I just see black and white. In the case of some job boards, I might see blocks of color which point to the various keywords I am searching on. However, they come to me, they are found based upon keywords of some sort. Of course I read every resume that comes across my desk…but it has to get here first…and for that I rely on keywords and phrases.

I do not recommend that you create a block of keywords just for the sake of having the resume found. I routinely delete those resumes from my desktop. That technique is (too me) a form of SPAM…and while I might like Spam the pseudo-food, I can not stand SPAM the internet garbage.

As it turns out, the length of the resume is not important. The content of the resume is of great importance.

Just like any document, content is King. Regardless of the application; web, email or a resume…what is in the document is more important that what the document is on. I can not find a resume that does not have the keywords I need to see…and neither can the corporate recruiter. I frequently see internal buzzwords used in a resume without any indication as to what the software/process is (I can usually figure it out from contextual meanings). I can not search on some of the acronyms used as internal/company specific buzz…which are sometimes just a re-branding of a commonly used third party process/software. But I can figure it out (sometimes) because I’m human…can the search engine find the phrase and make some sort of sense from it? Maybe not. Is it worth the risk that your resume can/will be found? Probably not.

Are job posting sites all that important. Absolutely. In a recent survey, ERE Media (ere.net) found that job boards, “generally rated well with nearly 50 percent of respondents calling them “effective” or “very effective.” The respondents were recruiters, HR professionals and hiring managers from a wide spectrum of companies and industries. To make matters more intense…also according to ERE Media (ere.net) in that recent survey, “some respondents said they make over 50 percent of annual hires from online job sites,” making it vital that your resume is designed to be found by recruiters and hiring managers who are seeking your skills.

If you are serious about getting your resume noticed, one might consider carefully crafting the resume to think like a machine would think. Think keywords. Think Boolean. Think content.

02.13.09

The One Page Resume

Posted in Brenda at 10:26 am by livefood

When I got off the phone I was shaking my head again. “How sad,” I thought.

The candidate was caught in the typical chicken and egg process…less experience than most firms would want for the job she wanted (and probably could do)…and not able to secure a position to get that experience. But that wasn’t the sad part (there are work-a-rounds for most of those situations).

She had visited a personnel agency. This particular agency was not one I would have recommended to her, not that the shop is bad…just that they were probably not the place for her to find a job. You and I both know that all recruiting groups are not the same. Most specialize in a vertical or a horizontal…all the good ones are pretty focused. The agency she had gone too was not a group of recruiters. They placed administrative folks in the middle of the salary range. The advice they gave the candidate was inappropriate within the context of her career goals. They simply didn’t the experience to offer the advice. They should have said that.

They told the candidate that her resume should be no more than one page long. Once upon a time, I gave the same advice. But then, back then (way back then I might add), I was placing people in the administrative arena in a very local market. Folks were answering ads placed in the newspapers and coming in to speak with us…job boards really had not become the force they can be in today’s market. What was good then, and still good in some situations, is not working today. A lot of the change has been brought on by the internet, job boards and search engines (internally in the form of data bases or externally on the internet).

As it turns out, this particular candidate is a technically oriented person with a long list of skills on hardware and software combinations. She has been in the workforce for a couple of decades. There is probably no way to adequately stuff her bio into a single page. My short conversation with the candidate provided more information that was on her shorten resume and I think we may have only touched the edges of her abilities.

As it turned out, we (she and I) came to a quick conclusion that our firm was not the right place for her. However, I could tell she was frustrated and I took some time to speak with her. I think I may have learned as much as she did during that conversation.

She was not getting any responses to her resume that was posted on two major job boards. She didn’t even get a response from me. She called me…I didn’t call her. I wouldn’t have called her. Her resume didn’t provide enough hits to be of interest. As I examined it later, it was very short and only went back a couple of years with any detail. The resume as constructed from the recommendation of the personnel agency was not doing the candidate any favors.

The ironic thing was that the candidate is a pretty competent data base programmer. But the resume wouldn’t be pulled up very high from any data base without enough emphasis (or even listing of) her skill sets in keyword terms. I was surprised that she hadn’t thought of it…but alas, she had been listening to a “professional” and was following their lead.

So what should she do…good question…next post :-)